Nevada Ghost towns

Nevada Ghost towns

The discovery of a vein of silver mines in Nevada in 1859 triggered a rush of new mining camps all across the country as prospectors from the eastern United States went searching for silver.

Often the miners who had just made their money would take all they could with them when they left, including their houses, structures, and machinery. Nevada has over 600 deserted towns, which is greater than the numbernevada mining towns of cities that are currently inhabited in the State! Isn’t that astonishing?  Some townships have a few inhabitants, and in the northern part of the state, a significant portion of these “living” ghost towns can be found. In this list, you’ll find six ghost towns to explore in Nevada. Take a look.

 

Jarbidge

The abandoned ghost town of Jarbidge may be found in northern Nevada. But dwarfed by its stunning natural surroundings, the quiet mining town was one of the last communities to join the Gold Rush, though it ceased up business during World War I. Mining huts and structures, such as the town’s old prison, may still be seen by tourists.

 

Rhyolite

Rhythm Hill, also known as Rhyolite, had a community of about 5,000 people and had numerous saloons, gaming tables, and lodging rooms. After the San Francisco quake in the year that followed, many of the quarries collapsed. Now, Rhyolite is among the most visited ghost cities in the region, in the early 1900s, it was all but deserted.

 

Unionville

In reality, before Mark Twain visited Unionville, the town was renowned for a deposit of gold mining that drew the likes of the US novelist, who went on to write a book about his time there entitled “Roughing It.” Twain depicts the tiny cottage he resided in which was forced into a hillside in his book as the starting point of his relocation to Unionville, Missouri. Visitors can now see the cabin up close; however, the deterioration due to exposure to the weather has made it too hazardous to visit.

 

Pioche

During the mining surge there in the region, people flocked to the town of Pioche. While the town thrived, gunfire and shootouts used to be a common thing in the streets. As stated before, victims were buried in the Boot Hill Cemetery, a short distance from the first aerial tramway. The Million Dollar Courthouse and the ghostly Overland Hotel & Saloon are among the best visits; don’t miss these two interesting buildings.

 

Goldfield

There was one of the biggest boom-and-busts in U.S. history, when over 30,000 people lived in Goldfield, situated halfway between Reno and Las Vegas. Though around 300 people continue to dwell amid the ghost town’s ruins, the courthouse is still equipped with Tiffany & Co. lights and the Goldfield Hotel is still home to wandering, restless spirits!

This historic hotel in Goldfield, Nevada, looks very beautiful, especially at night.

 

 

Berlin

Silver was found in the neighboring central Nevada highlands in the late 1800s, and therefore Berlin was created soon after. The ancient mining community is now maintained by the Nevada State Parks department, and has buildings dating back to the late 1800s that are furnished and include a machine shop and the 30-stamp mill that has the old Ford vehicle outside. To really appreciate the enormity of these relics, be sure to visit the Fossil House, wherein you may view the greatest collection of Ichthyosaur fossil remains in the world.

 

Belmont

Belmont has numerous historic buildings situated in the middle of the state, although many of them are roofless. The scouts carried the wood with them since it was difficult to get it in the arid wastelands of Nevada. Belmont Courthouse as well as the mill yard remains are well worth checking out.

 

nevada mining towns

 

Some Do’s and Don’ts

Ghost towns that are off the main road are not hard to find. Having an all-terrain vehicle is highly recommended. The dangerous sites include open, deserted mining tunnels and pits, as well as collapsed mine shafts where somebody may fall into. There are no mobile phone signals in certain places that are very far away. Please respect the history of these ancient structures by leaving all relics in place.

 

 

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