Seattle’s Scariest Hauntings

Seattle’s Scariest Hauntings

Nothing beats a classic scary horror story, certainly during Halloween, no matter if you believe in it or don’t. Many people are unaware that Seattle’s stunning scenery is home to a number of ghosts, haunts, and other strange occurrences. Here’s a rundown of several of Seattle’s most ghostly sites for all you frightful enthusiasts.

Seattle’s Underground

The city of Seattle was reconstructed on top of itself after the Great Seattle Fire in 1889. The neighborhood’s spurned souls are said to haunt the remaining beneath, which is rumored to be haunted by ghostly spirits. As you go through the world-famous Underground Tour’s secret tunnels, you may uncover their tales.

The Owl N Thistle

This tavern is housed in a structure that traces its origins before the 1930s. The structure was once a cafeteria, but it was soon replaced with a Cajun eatery. It wasn’t till 1991 that a different company bought it and renamed it the Owl n Thistle Pub. The proprietor had resold that after it was purchased. And that owner made it a bar.

If you go inside this tavern, though, you may observe the piano playing. When there are just a few customers inside the tavern, there is a spirit who plays the piano. Employees also remark that they frequently feel as though someone is observing them.

Pike Place Market

Pike Place Market is not only among the oldest and most renowned marketplaces in the world, but it is also definitely among the most cursed. You still don’t trust us? Many individuals claimed to have seen spirits and have had paranormal experiences. The reports are really quite frequent. Many speculate that this is due to the fact that the market was built atop an old Indian burial place. Princess Angeline is reported to be the most often spotted ghost. She was a native American as well as the Chief’s daughter. The Duwamish clan included Chief Seattle and Princess Angeline. The princess resided in one of the market’s cabins. In 1855, a treaty was signed that forced her whole tribe to depart, but she resisted. It is said that she never left the place even after her death there. Visitors will observe her strolling around the marketplace as she would in reality.

Kells Irish Restaurant

The bar is housed in the Butterworth Building, which formerly had been a morgue. The bar is presently housed in the underground space, which was originally an embalming chamber, according to the bar’s proprietor. While several ghosts are reported to come here, a small girl with red hair and “Charlie,” who is claimed to emerge in the Guinness glass, are the two main sights.

The Merchant’s Café

Another story shared among the staff is about a small girl and boy who haunt the Merchants’ cellar. Merchants were devastated by a fire in 1938, which claimed the lives of these young people. Many people see mysterious entities hanging around and pulling pranks on the employees here.

The basement facilities appear to be one of the busiest spots. Many people have claimed to have seen a lady, doors slamming shut, and a woman talking into men’s ears inside.

Seattle’s Scariest Hauntings

Moore Theater

The Moore Theatre was built in order to attract visitors to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in 1909. Since its inception in 1907, the playhouse has staged a variety of events including performing arts, movies, art exhibitions, marches, remakes, minstrel performances, and even boxing contests. Mr. Moore is believed to still be wandering the hallways.

University Heights Center

While most people think of this location as a community center, it used to be a school. According to rumors, a boy still wanders the halls. Even when the facility is closed, many building occupants hear weird noises, children’s giggling, and other sounds.

Seattle is Built on Native Land

THE CITY OF SEATTLE RESIDES ON THE TRADITIONAL LAND OF THE COAST SALISH PEOPLES, PAST AND PRESENT. WE HONOR WITH GRATITUDE OUR SHARED LAND AND WATERWAYS, AS WELL AS THE HISTORY AND HERITAGE OF OUR INDIGENOUS NEIGHBORS.