Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum

Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum

After seeing the Snoqualmie Falls go see the Historical Museum.

Some Background:

Ada Snyder Hill’s early efforts resulted in the establishment of the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum. She arrived in the Valley in 1910 to instruct school and started gathering historical artifacts for the show she put together for the platting of North Bend in 1939. They formed the foundation for today’s collection, which contains treasured objects and tales from all around the Snoqualmie Valley.

 

These objects were originally stored in a classroom at North Bend High School, where Mrs. Hill worked as a teacher. For over a decade, she added things as they were given, cataloging them, arranging the exhibits, and giving tours to guests without assistance. Mrs. Hill also conducted interviews and documented the tales and histories of the family who first lived in the Valley.

 

In 1960, when the school wanted a more permanent spot the community banded together to fill the void, and the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Society was born. Funds were sought to construct a tiny structure, and memberships were requested to assist the budding group. The City of North Bend decided to make a small plot of land next to the library vacant, and a 16’x30′ concrete block structure was prepared for usage and relocated into that autumn. After five years, there was a pressing need for greater room. The society once again gave enough finances, and the building’s length was doubled.

Role of the community

The Board of Trustees looked into the prospect of acquiring this current building in 1975, after the State Department of Highways deemed it excess property. It was suitable for the growing collection because of its size, location, and concrete construction. The collection was boxed up and transported, and the museum inaugurated April 27, 1979, after 2 years of talks with the State and the City of North Bend, and 2 additional years of money raising and volunteer work to refurbish it so that it could be used as a museum.

The entire community has graciously backed every significant step, indicating their enthusiasm in, acknowledgement of, and acceptance of the Valley’s heritage maintenance.

 

Where is it?

It is now situated in the Gardiner Weeks Memorial Park at 320 Bendigo Blvd S in North Bend. The Meadowbrook Hotel ledger, William Taylor’s cap and pistol, the Fall City Study Club keepsakes and mementos. There is a small bear in a glass case and you may be asked your thoughts on this – be prepared.  There are  many more spectacular images and artifacts are among the collection’s highlights. A trip will provide you with a unique perspective on the changing history of the Snoqualmie Valley.

Exploring the area

The great thing about visiting the Valley Museum is that you can explore the wildlife in the area too. Rexing Dash Cam is the best gadget you can use with your car to enhance the experience. Not only that you will be able to see wildlife in the area.

 

The Rexing Dash Cam is a small, palm sized camera that you can fit easily on the dashboard of your car and position to face the road. It is designed to record constantly so that you don’t miss any wildlife, scenic areas, or spots.

Who’s running it today?

Carrying the legacy forward these days is Mr. Gardiner, who is a retired teaching professional from the history department. Most of the visitors say that he is quite well acquainted with the historical facts considering his academic and professional background. According to the visitors, he greets everyone with a smile and is always keen to show people around and answer their queries. His interest and knowledge with the area is one of the reasons why spending an afternoon at the Snoqualmie Valley Museum is a great idea. Go say hello and be prepared to answer the question on the bear. 🙂

 

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